Gut microbiota in autism and mood disorders

Abstract The hypothesis of an important role of gut microbiota in the maintenance of physiological state into the gastrointestinal (GI) system is supported by several studies that have shown a qualitative and quantitative alteration of the intestinal flora in a number of gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases. In the last few years, the importance of gut microbiota impairment in the etiopathogenesis … Read More

Pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorders: Revisiting gastrointestinal involvement and immune imbalance

AbstractAutism spectrum disorders (ASD) comprise a group of neurodevelopmental abnormalities that begin in early childhood and are characterized by impairment of social communication and behavioral problems includingrestricted interests and repetitive behaviors.  Several genes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of ASD, most of them are involved in neuronal synaptogenesis. A number of environmental factors and associated conditions such as gastrointestinal … Read More

The Perturbance of Microbiome and Gut-Brain Axis in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Abstract Gastrointestinal problems have been documented in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Studies have found that these disturbances may be associated with an altered gut microbiome in ASD. Furthermore, in ASD, these alterations are implicated in increased gut permeability, or “leaky gut”, which allows bacterial metabolites to cross the gut barrier, impacting neuro development during early childhood in susceptible subjects by … Read More